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* Spring Turkey Hunting - Call selection

Why do I carry different calls in my turkey vest?
by Don Mattice (Dr. Honk)
The answer is quite simple. There are days when one call will get  toms fired up and other days when you use your favorite call and do not get one response.
That does not mean the turkeys have left the area. They are still around, just not responding to the call you have selected.
I recall this first happening about 10 years ago. I was hunting a small wood lot near my home. There was a light mist in the air as I set out my single hen decoy  I put a diaphram call in my mouth and and ran a series of yelps. I would wait about five minutes and then begin the series again, adding some clucks and purrs. I continued this pattern for about 40 minutes. Nothing was responding. I had a few more hours to hunt so I decided to wait it out in that small patch of woods. I thought I would switch it up a little and practice with a slate call I had brought along.
I tried scratching out some turkey sounds but all I could get from the damp slate were some very faint yelps. To me they were barely audible but a tom exploded with a thunderous gobble about twenty yards away. I scratched out another yelp and the gobbler came in like he was on a string. I killed him at 10 steps.

The Diaphram Call




This call is the most difficult  to master but offers the advantage of hands free calling. The diaphram allows you to make those  seductive yelps or clucks to close that gobbler without spooking the bird with hand movement.
There are two basic types of diaphram calls, clear calls and raspy calls. Clear calls are meant to sound like young hens. They are configured with single or multiple reeds. When I first began turkey hinting,I started out using this style of call (Quaker Boy Pro triple) and killed a lot of gobblers.
There were times when I could get a gobbler to answer me on the roost but as soon as he hit the ground, that old boss hen would lead him in the opposite direction. I wanted to put a little rasp in my calling to mimic her but could not figure out how to accomplish this. It was not until several years later that I discovered there were calls designed to be raspy.
Raspy calls are constructed with a top reed that has a cut of some shape and additional uncut reeds below. My favorite "go to" call is a HS Strut split V ll, lll or lV. I have killed the majority of my 83 gobblers using this call.

The Box Call




This call is one of the easiest calls to use. It is very popular with  hunters that are just starting out or for the seasoned veteran that prefers this style call. I carry one of these calls in my vest and use it when I am trying to locate a late morning gobbler or when I can not get a response using my diaphram call.
The important thing to learn when using a box call or other style call  is cadence. Cadence is the rhythm of a call. The next time you are in the field, listen to the sounds of a real hen and try to duplicate those sounds.

The "Slate" Call



Also known as the peg and pot, this call produces some very realistic turkey sounds. You will need to practice some with this call as it is a little more difficult to use than the box call. The original calls were made with a slate surface on top of a sound chamber. Sounds are produced by scratching a striker on the surface of the slate. Today's modern calls have surfaces made of slate, glass, aluminum or composite materials.

The three style calls mentioned above are the most widely used. There are other calls available such as the wing bone yelper and a tube call.
I have made several wing bone yelpers over the past few years and plan on using one this coming spring to call in a gobbler.
















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